Strengthen Your Memory With This Great Advice

Not being able to recall information when you want is always irritating. If you are starting to lose important memories, then, there are ways that you can hold onto the ones that you still have. Take some advice here to aid to getting back lost memories or preventing further decline.

Keep a running list of the things you want to accomplish each day. As you finish one item, cross it off and move on to the next. Simultaneously, keep adding items at the bottom of the list as they arise. In this way you will never forget what you need to do next.

The phrase "use it or lose it" definitely applies to your memory. Make time to engage in activities that require you to recall information, such as crossword puzzles, learning a new skill or reading. Teaching someone else is also a good way to make active use of your memory and prevent it from becoming rusty.

If you want to have a better long-term memory, then you need to get in the practice of regular stretching and other exercise. These exercises keep the brain's arteries open, and this is important because the brain is responsible for 15 percent of your body's blood flow. Stretching also increases energy, flexibility and relaxation, which all help towards improved long-term memory as well.

Keep a running list of the things you want to accomplish each day. As you finish one item, cross it off and move on to the next. Simultaneously, keep adding items at the bottom of the list as they arise. In this way you will never forget what you need to do next.

Visualizing yourself recalling information is actually a great way in which you can work to recall information. You are basically training your brain to be able to memorize items when you foresee yourself dipping into that memory bank to pull them out at a later date. Think of it like visualizing your hand turning a doorknob before you actually turn it.

It may sound silly, but one way to improve memory is to surround yourself with good friends, and to maintain an active social life. A Harvard study suggests that those who had active and fulfilling social lives, showed rates of cognitive decline significantly lower than their less socially active peers.

Saying what you're trying to remember outloud is a fast and easy way to boost your memory. Though it may feel silly at first, saying things outloud is a great tool for memorization. When you re-read something over and over again to try to memorize it, you may start skimming. Saying it outloud forces you to read and listen to the whole thing each time.

Give your full attention to what is happening around you. You may think you're focusing your attention, but you mind may actually be wandering instead of focusing efficiently. Focus your mind and free your thoughts from distractions. Keep your goals and topic in mind and take notes if you have to.

Teaching others goes a long way in helping improve your memory. An example of this would be a person forgetting how they taught their grandson to swim. If the person tells more people the story, they will remember what happened much easier. This way, you can, and will, reinforce this in your mind, and make it far more difficult to forget.

Did you know that, even late in life, you can grow new brain cells within the memory center of your brain? Recent research has revealed that high-level aerobic exercise, such as running and bicycling, actually stimulates the growth of new brain neurons within the brain's hippocampus. If you want to have a better memory, adding more aerobic exercise to your daily activities will help.

For important things you have to remember on a certain day, use a pen and write the information on your hands. This is a technique that has been used for generations and it works because you know the information is on you at all times. Just make sure you do not wash your hands!

Build consistent study times into your schedule. To build your long-term memory, you need to fight the urge to cram. Cramming information will place it in your short-term memory, and it will easily fall to the wayside once the information is used. To really commit something to your memory, develop daily sessions where you study it with real focus. Keep it consistent, and you will soon find the information is with you for the long haul!

If you need help retaining a difficult concept or remembering the massive amount of information you studied the night before that big college exam, get up and get moving. The brain, like other parts of our body, requires energy to work, and it gets that energy from oxygen and other nutrients carried through the bloodstream. Spending long, unbroken hours in a chair, pouring over books or staring at a computer screen, causes the blood to congeal and deprives the brain of that needed energy. So get up and go for a brisk walk or a swim, anything to get the blood pumping and moving through your body. It's a proven fact that the more physically active you are, the smarter you will be too.

Try not to reminisce with others often. Get togethers with friends and family can be fun. Unfortunately, they can also have a negative impact on your memory. Recalling something with a group can actually alter your memory of an event slightly. Your memory may conform to what everyone else remembers.

Studies have shown that memory retention is much better if regular studying sessions are planned rather than one-off marathon Discover More Here sessions. This gives the brain time to process the information properly. If time is not taken to focus on the materials in a relaxed environment, then it is possible to overlook important items in haste.

Exercise is as good for your memory as it is for your body. Treating your body well enhances your recall, and your ability to process information. In addition, when you are exercising you will increase oxygen flow to the brain, and reduce your risk of developing a disorder. Exercise also enhances the activation of chemicals that are essential for protecting the cells of the brain.

If you want to boost your memory, start by finding ways to reduce stress. When you experience stress, your body release cortisol. This hormone reduces the ability of your brain to recall old memories or store new ones. By reducing your stress levels, you can reduce the amount of cortisol in your system and in turn improve your memory.

Now that you have these strategies, try using them every day and see how your memory improves. Chances are you'll still remember all 50 states and you won't know the exact number of cars that you passed on your drive home but can you remember what you had for dinner now?

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